Please Comment ...

Please let us know what you think! Any comments are welcome, including corrections if you see anything wrong, misspellled ;), etc. If you have material that is not yet posted on this webpage, please provide a link, so that we can add it.

Jul. 12, 2017

Paulina



Attached photo of my mother...

Jul. 12, 2017

Paulina

Hello, thank you ... I have tried to keep in touch with my grandfather's legitimate children / grandchildren (because my mother and uncle were born here in Mexico as a result of a relationship with my grandmother) ... But unfortunately, they do not want
them or not Interests to keep in touch with us, saddens me, especially because my mother dreams of knowing a little more about the past of who was her father and having a family ... Anyway, I guess it should not be comfortable to know that there is the " Other
family "of your father / grandfather ...

Attached photo of my uncle

Oct. 17, 2015

.

Pau,

This website is probably as comprehensive as can be. You will be hard-pressed to find some material about General Mow that is not listed or posted somewhere here (but you surely can/should try). Therefore, if you wan to learn more about Pang Tsu Mow, start
reading all the material provided here. A good start are the two magazine stories by O'Connor, "The Tarnished Treasure of General Mow", Coronet Vol. 41, 1957, pp. 111-116, and by Langdon, "General Mow and the $19,000,000", Climax, June 1957, pp. 2 - 9. They
provide two very opposing views on the embezzlement scandal. You can then check their sources and see who has the stronger arguments. If you speak Chinese, try the 45-minute documentary at <http://taihai.cntv.cn/2015/05/18/VIDE1431914827149404.shtml> (or try
the link under "Bibliography"). Of course if you are part of the extended Mow family, just approach your older relatives, such as Van or William Mow. They should be able to provide much more detail than you will ever find here.

Oct. 16, 2015

Pau

Hello, I would like to get in touch with someone to help me know more about Pang Tsu Mow ... I am very interested, because it's my ancestor. thank you! Sorry my previous mail was misspelled

Oct. 15, 2015

Wei W

Did you know that Mow was involved in KMT corruption scandals as early as 1938? In a book by Laura Li on "Madame Chiang Kai-shek: China's Eternal First Lady", reasons are given for the resignation of Madam CKS from the position of China's Air
 Ministry.
One of them is that CKS did do enough to stamp internal corruption. It says, ".. Gen. Zhou was merely demoted a rung ... , as was Gen. Mao Bangchu, another senior air force official implicated in the corruption scandal." Apparently
 Mow (the book uses an older
transcription) was corrupt long before the 1951 embezzlement scandal.

Oct. 15, 2015

Peter

Just found a copy of the 1952 Senate hearings on the case with testimony of Mow's assistant Frances Yuan (who travelled with him to Texas before he vanished into Mexico) and Mow's right hand Col. Hsiang. Lots of details and insights here - highly recommended.
The hearing was on July 10, 1952, but the documents were only released in 1963! You can find it under {"Congressional Hearing #HRG-1952-SJS-0024, Subcommittee To Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws;
Committee on the Judiciary, "Testimony of Frances Yuan and Col. Ve-Shen Hsiang", Hearing Dates: Jul. 1, 10, 1952; Senate Sudoc Number: Y4.J89/2:Y9/3; Length: 61 pp.; Legacy CIS Number: 87 S1543-30}.



And concerning Koo's bias : He is one of the great historical statesmen of the last century and after serving his country in various positions finally became a judge on the International Court of Justice in The Hague. I don't think you can find somebody less
biased. Especially if you consider that he gave the interviews for his oral history in the 70th in New York at his alma mater Columbia University. He lived out his live in the US, where he died in 1985. Why should he lie about the 1950 scandal. I believe every
word he says.

Oct. 9, 2015

Jia

Well - no surprise here. Koo was part of the regime and its inner circle. Of course he would defend Chiang Kai-Chek and his henchman and blame Mow. If there ever was a "biased" source, it is Koo's oral history.

Aug. 13, 2015

Peter

I recently got my hands on Wellington Koo's oral history. In it are close to 300 pages about the Mow events. Koo was the ambassador to the US at that time and was closely involved in all aspects of this case. Fascinating stuff - he basically talks about
the meetings with all the different players, including Mow and Hsiang, and how he first did not know what to make of it. At the end he lays the blame squarely on Mow. I have attached a few passages – feel free to post.

Aug. 3, 2015

Wei W

The general has served an increasingly corrupt government for the better part of 20 years. Maybe he was a patriot with best intentions early on, but by the time of 228 Massacre (二二八事件) in 1947 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6400879.stm), it should

have been clear what the Chiang Kai-Chek regime was all about. While corruption and white terror was now rampant, the general lived a posh life in DC, mostly supported by American tax dollars. Suppression and corruption got so bad that US seriously considered

siding with the communists on the mainland – imaging that! Only when Mow fell out of favor with the inner circle in ‘51 and was about to lose all his privileges, did he turn on them. Moving millions into his private accounts around the word, leaving a family

of five behind to live the good life with his mistress in Mexico ... not much of a patriot in my book, nor hero or even valiant poster boy.

Jul. 27, 2015

Jia

I think he was definitely a hero. He stood up to the Chiang-Kay Chek regime and would not give them more funds to pursue there dirty work. All these other report as just McCarthy era stuff. Don't believe everything written in the press.